in

An Antiques Roadshow host is stunned by a HUGE valuation of medieval keys – after starting his extensive collection with a single


An Antiques Roadshow host was stunned to learn his extensive collection of medieval keys is worth thousands of pounds in the latest episode of the BBC show.

In the episode that aired on Sunday, the guest brought along a huge number of keys that he had accumulated after being given one by his grandfather when he was a child.

Some of them date back to the 15th century, he explained, having built up the collection by picking up keys at car boot sales before seeking out more selective pieces from private sellers and auctions.

When viewing the collection, expert Marc Allum said he was impressed by the size of the collection and surprisingly admitted that all the keys could be worth a total of £20,000.

The guest seemed somewhat taken aback by the huge sum, but remained cautious about whether he would consider selling his vast collection.

An Antiques Roadshow host was stunned to learn his extensive collection of medieval keys is worth thousands of pounds in the latest episode of the BBC show.

It comes after another Antiques Roadshow guest admitted on a recent episode that his daughter was probably ‘scared to death’ when he found out his family’s pinwheel was worth a small fortune because he ‘kept it in his living room’.

During the show, viewers could see expert Brad Witherell appreciating a 19th-century wooden pinwheel as the PBS series traveled to Tulsa, Oklahoma for filming.

According to the owner, the bike had a long and colorful history and he claimed to have inherited the quirky item from his uncle.

Recommended Article
Wrestling star dies aged 40 - just nine days after his last fight

He explained: ‘My uncle and aunt came to Oklahoma in 1898.

“He was a professional player, they traveled through Oklahoma, went to Shawnee and came back.

“They decided they liked Tulsa best, and it was called Tulsee Town at the time, and he rented a building in Tulsa that had a cigar stand, a barber shop, a pool table, and an arcade upstairs.

“He operated a cigar stand and soon discovered that lending money to gamblers was money.

“And when they went broke, they came down and pawned their ring to him or the diamond.

In the episode that aired on Sunday, the guest brought along a huge number of keys that he had accumulated after being given one by his grandfather when he was a child.

In the episode that aired on Sunday, the guest brought along a huge number of keys that he had accumulated after being given one by his grandfather when he was a child.

“The story goes that if it was a big enough diamond and enough money, he would go up and win the money he lent them.

“He would still hold his diamond for them to pick up, and at that time or soon after, the oil boom hit Tulsa and that’s when his business really boomed, but of course statehood came along, which kind of slowed down the gambling situation. great offer.

Brad then delved deeper into the origin of the bike, stating that it was made by Will & Fink in San Francisco.



What do you think?

Deja una respuesta

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

Jaws star Susan Backlinie dies aged 77: The actress played the first shark victim in Steven Spielberg’s iconic film

Kylie Jenner stuns in curve-hugging red dress as she heads out to dinner with her fashionable sister Kendall in LA