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Glamor doctor accused of faking cancer diagnosis to swindle boyfriend out of $160,000


A glamorous Canadian doctor has been banned from practicing medicine and shamed by friends who say she defrauded them out of $160,000 by falsely diagnosing cancer.

Monica Kehar is accused of fabricating an illness to extort money from a friend of Dr. Meaghan Labine before she disappeared.

The pair met in 2018 when they were both selected to sit on the national body representing the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

Labine says Kehar preyed on her conscience, asked her for money and ran away after receiving the money.

«It seemed like no matter how much I borrowed, it was never enough,» Labine told CBC News.

Monica Kehar is accused of defrauding a fellow doctor who paid out more than CAD 160,000 after he faked a cancer diagnosis and asked for money

Labine presented Kehar with the contracts she had signed and promised to pay her back, but the requests didn’t stop.

Labine told CBC News that she continued to loan money to Kehar «because she thought that if she didn’t help her finish medical school, she would never get her money back.»

Things came to a head when Kehar told Labina that she had a job offer from a prominent doctor. However, when Labine confronted this doctor at a meeting, Kehar’s deception was exposed.

«I felt absolutely humiliated,» Labine told the publication. «How could I have been so stupid to let myself be led like this?»

She later learned that not only had Kehar lied about the illness and the job offer, but she had not even been accepted into the residency program in Calgary.

In fact, Kehar was kicked out of her medical program after a series of transgressions that culminated in her fabricating a serious medical condition.

On November 13, 2020, an inquiry committee of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba censured Kehar «as a record of its disapproval of her conduct».

According to documents reviewed by DailyMail.com, Kehar enrolled at the College and enrolled as a first-year family medicine resident at the University of Manitoba in February 2019.

Kehar was kicked out of the Manitoba program after a series of infractions that culminated in tampering with documents and fabricating a serious medical condition.

Kehar was kicked out of the Manitoba program after a series of infractions that culminated in tampering with documents and fabricating a serious medical condition.

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The college later found that Kehar had defrauded

The college later found that Kehar had defrauded «significant sums of money» from two medical colleagues after lying about her medical condition «to gain sympathy and support».

However, she began taking electives in Saskatchewan without a proper license. Kehar later claimed that this slip was «unintentional».

After being alerted to the issue, Kehar immediately stopped practicing and edited an email she received from the College before forwarding it to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan.

«This was an apparent attempt by Ms. Kehar to rectify the situation and shift responsibility for this error from herself to the college,» the document said.

The College discovered the change on February 14, 2019 and reported it to the University of Manitoba on the same day.

The finding prompted both the College and the University to conduct months-long investigations into Kehar’s conduct.

She denied altering the email but was on paid leave pending further review.

Meaghan Labine says she still hasn't been paid despite winning default judgment against Kehar in 2022
Kehar has a long history of lying, evidenced by documents from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba investigative committee

Meaghan Labine says she has yet to be paid despite winning a default judgment against Kehar in 2022. Kehar has a long history of lying, according to documents from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba Investigation Committee

Kehar later contacted the administrators and claimed that she «received an email from another person who confessed to hacking her account and changing her email dated February 13, 2019.»

Around March 13, Kehar was allowed to return to her residency duties, and about two days later, the university provided her with a report that showed there was no evidence to support the hacking claim.

Kehar eventually took responsibility for altering the document, blaming a ‘brief episode of mental exhaustion’. She claimed the decision stemmed from «fear, stress, exhaustion and nervousness».

Also in 2019, Kehar had her French bulldog, Django, registered in Alberta as an «emotional support dog» for «stress-related» reasons, as documented by DailyMail.com.

She later admitted to altering the offending email and was expelled from the University of Manitoba’s Family Medicine Program on May 7.

«Her expulsion was based on her admission of altering the email in question and the faculty’s finding that Ms. Kehar had been dishonest in relation to certain other academic events, which she denied,» the document states.

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A few weeks later, Kehar appealed her expulsion to the university’s local disciplinary committee.

In the appeal, she “described a concern that she might have a serious medical condition…and that she underwent surgery in January 2019 to correct the problem.”

The documentary quotes her as saying: «While I am not comfortable discussing this issue, I now understand that it is relevant to this matter and has had an impact on me and my actions during this time.»

On May 28, seven days after the appeal was filed, Kehar was questioned by a college investigator. She described that she was «going through a very difficult time» in early 2018 and was «feeling extremely stressed at the time».

After her expulsion from the residency program at the University of Manitoba, Kehar opened an electrical muscle stimulation clinic in Surrey, British Columbia.

After her expulsion from the residency program at the University of Manitoba, Kehar opened an electrical muscle stimulation clinic in Surrey, British Columbia.

Kehar also insisted that she underwent surgery on January 8 but did not produce the documentation.

An appeal against Kehar’s expulsion was heard and dismissed in June – but she filed again in July.

In August, Kehar provided the college with a letter allegedly written by the office manager of her surgical clinic as evidence of the aforementioned surgery.

Her lawyers argued there was no documentation from the hospital because Kehar «didn’t stay overnight».

A subsequent investigation by the College found no evidence to support Kehar’s claim of diagnosis, nor her claim that she underwent surgery at the hospital she named.

In addition, the investigation found that the letter she provided was written much earlier and related to a different matter, but was altered by Kehar.

The surgeon she identified confirmed to the College that the only procedures he ever performed on Kehar were in October 2017 and February 2018, and none of them were related to the alleged «serious medical condition.»

A second appeal against her expulsion was heard on 24 January 2020 and dismissed five days later.

The College later learned that Kehar had lied to two colleagues about her personal situation, including her medical condition, «to gain sympathy and support».

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Those colleagues loaned Kehar «substantial sums of money in response to her requests for help on numerous occasions,» the document said.

Kehar «admitted that her conduct was a serious error and in retrospect expressed remorse for her actions» and «acknowledged that she had demonstrated an inability to practise».

Despite being banned from practicing medicine, former clients insist that Kehar advertised

Despite being banned from practicing medicine, former clients insist that Kehar advertised «MD services» and presented herself as a licensed physician.

Her disqualification was upheld, meaning she was banned from practicing medicine in the country.

Despite this, Kehar moved to British Columbia and founded Prestige Body Lab, an electrical muscle stimulation clinic, posing as a doctor all along.

Business cards seen on DailyMail.com promise «services provided by an MD» at the Surrey clinic, which has since closed.

Under Canadian regulations, Kehar can still refer to herself as a doctor or MD, but she cannot mislead the public into believing she is licensed to practice medicine.

And some former clients insist she did just that.

On the clinic’s Instagram page, which has since been taken down, Kehar offered «free consultations and MD services» in exchange for honest reviews.

One comment under the May 2023 testimonial claims that Kehar «lied to thousands of women by presenting herself as an active doctor.»

«Just giving you a friendly heads up on how many influencers had to post, I apologize to the women in the greater Vancouver area as they were responsible for promoting this particular entrepreneur in exchange for a free or discounted session,» the commenter wrote.

Another user claimed they were «one of her victims» and thanked the original commenter for «saving a lot of people from her.»

Despite winning a default judgment against Kehar in Ontario Superior Court in 2022, Labine has yet to pay back the thousands of dollars she lost.

She recently filed a lawsuit in British Columbia in an attempt to recover the money. While Kehar has promised to pay her back, Labine has her doubts.

«When pressed for details or a meeting with my lawyer, he won’t provide anything,» she told CBC News.



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