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Russian tycoon builds fence around £2.8m Buckinghamshire estate after fierce war with neighbors over plans for 6ft ‘Berlin Wall’


A Russian tycoon has finally built a £2.8 million fence around his Buckinghamshire mansion after a fierce war with his neighbours.

Alexander Mosionzhik’s original plans infuriated the local residents living in the leafy village of Marley Bottom.

He was accused of trying to erect a «Berlin Wall» around his sprawling grounds with villagers claiming it would look like a «prison».

But now new photos show a wire fence at the boundary of his palatial home, which Mr Mosionzhik says will deter anti-social behaviour.

Local residents claimed it would ruin their country walks and harm wildlife and urged Buckinghamshire Council to block the millionaire’s plans, which they described as ugly.

He proposed building a six-foot metal palisade security fence, but opted instead for a wire fence to assuage local concerns. Council planners later approved the plans.

A new fence has been built around Alexander Mosionzhik’s £2.8m country estate in Buckinghamshire.

Some locals living in Marlow Bottom, Buckinghamshire, were angry after Mr Mosionzhik (pictured) erected a security barrier

Some locals living in Marlow Bottom, Buckinghamshire, were angry after Mr Mosionzhik (pictured) erected a security barrier

Alexander Mosionzhik is currently renovating the property (pictured) on his extensive £2.9m estate in Marlow Bottom, Buckinghamshire.

Alexander Mosionzhik is currently renovating the property (pictured) on his extensive £2.9m estate in Marlow Bottom, Buckinghamshire.

But while some locals were happy after the change in plans, others expressed concerns.

Simone Poli, 84, said she thought erecting the fence had «blocked» wildlife corridors.

This was after she and her husband noticed an increase in the number of wild animals entering their garden since the fence was erected.

Speaking to the Bucks Free Press, she said: “How it would affect the animals was one of our concerns at the beginning. We didn’t object to the plans – we’re too old! But I wish it now.’

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Steve Pack, 46, who can see the fence clearly from his back garden, added: “You see a lot of deer in these fields and the fear of what would happen to them was a big motivation for us to get involved.

Tycoon proposed building a six-foot metal palisade security fence, but opted instead for a wire fence to assuage local concerns.

Tycoon proposed building a six-foot metal palisade security fence, but opted instead for a wire fence to assuage local concerns.

The plans for the border were submitted in November last year and approved by the council in early January

The plans for the border were submitted in November last year and approved by the council in early January

“I was a little concerned when I saw all the equipment they had to clear the woods and build the fence.

“I’m mainly interested in what this shows you about the planning system. We sent a lot of letters to the council, but in the end I think it came down to the applicant himself saying, ‘I don’t want to make a fuss, so I’ll change it.’

“If they wanted to stick to their guns, I think they would be able to. I’m grateful they listened to us, but I think it’s a bit of a mockery of the system as a whole.

«If the same thing happened somewhere else and people didn’t notice and complain so much, it would just go on.»

But Mark Fulton, 49, one of the first people in Marlow Bottom to lodge a complaint against the proposal, said: ‘There were no problems with the fence going up, the people who were doing it just got on with the job and weren’t too noisy.

“We are all happy that the design has changed. You can see it’s there when the sun is at a certain angle, but otherwise you have to look to find it – I think our skepticism has been left behind in some respects.’

Mr Mosionzhik said the proposed fence would protect his property in Marley Bottom, Bucks, from

Mr Mosionzhik said the proposed fence would protect his property in Marley Bottom, Bucks, from «anti-social» behavior

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Marlow Bottom is a village in rural Buckinghamshire with a population of

Marlow Bottom is a village in rural Buckinghamshire with a population of

Sarah Bryant, 37, added: “I appreciate he had the right to put a fence around his property but the metal palisade was over the top.

«I liked that the owner sent us a letter through a PR agency saying he was sorry for everything that happened. I definitely give him credit for that.”

Mr. Mosionzhik made his millions in business and was formerly chairman of Nafta Moskva, a Russian oil trading company.

His recently acquired estate offers a grand house with eight bedrooms, four reception rooms, a garden, an outdoor swimming pool and 30 acres of private grounds.

It also has an outhouse which has two further bedrooms, two reception rooms, garages, stables and a barn.

The tycoon submitted the plans in November but was initially forced to scale back after 26 objections from angry local residents.

The planning application added: «With this in mind the new owner wishes to erect this fence to improve the security of the dwelling and associated grounds including ancient woodland.»

Villagers' complaints fell flat when Buckinghamshire Council approved the fence

Villagers’ complaints fell flat when Buckinghamshire Council approved the fence

Architect Eleanor Smith said Mr Mosionzhik was «happy to change the appearance of the fencing to alleviate any concerns local residents may have».

In announcing the decision, Steve Bambrick, director of planning and environment services at Buckinghamshire Council, said the council was satisfied that, provided the development was carried out «strictly in accordance with the detail» set out in the plans, the fence would comply with the law.

Alexander Mosionžik’s representative said he «regrets the controversy» surrounding his plans to restore the «dilapidated fence».

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They said: “While it is clear that this has upset some people, we have spoken to a number of local people who support our plans to restore and properly maintain the property and grounds.

“We are delighted that Buckinghamshire Council has now approved the application.

“This property has no public access or rights of way and the permitted fence will not obstruct any publicly accessible areas or rights of way.

“The style of fence, approved in collaboration with the council, will be similar to others found locally and entirely suitable for a rural setting.

«It is also worth noting that planning officers have carried out several visits following reports from individuals in the area who have not identified any breaches or irregularities at the property.»



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