in

The Pavilion, Salamanca: Proof Australia has become the ultimate nanny state as a Hobart sports bar is forced to make a major makeover that has enraged patrons

A pub which did not seek council approval to install TV screens in its outdoor area because the local council deemed it did not suit the «character and heritage value» of the area has since been given permission to keep the screens.

The Pavilion Sports Bar in Salamanca, Hobart opened in March 2023 with a beer garden with two large screens.

The owners, unaware of the local council’s strict regulations, did not apply to Hobart City Council for permission to put up the screens.

Co-owner Blair Brownless was eventually warned of the «violation» and applied to have them installed in November.

However, the council decided the screens were «unacceptable» because they did not comply with building regulations to protect heritage buildings in the area.

The Pavilion Sports Bar in Salamanca, Hobart opened in March 2023 with a beer garden with two large screens. Hobart City Council has now removed them

«The signs proposed for the outdoor dining area do not comply with the clauses… as this is consistent with placing the signs on a structure adjacent to sites of cultural significance…,» the council’s director of urban design and heritage, Nick Booth, said in a letter to the site. .

«(It) would, given their design, detract from the character and heritage value of the neighboring buildings individually and collectively.»

According to the scheme, television screens are considered signs.

The code states that any signs that display or contain «electronic or video graphics or mechanically moving characters or graphics that are intended for commercial purposes» are not permitted in order to protect the heritage buildings in the area.

Recommended Article
Labor deputy leader Angela Rayner is taken away in a police car after clashing with pro-Palestinian protesters who ask what kind of feminist are you? at a fundraising event

Mr Brownless slammed the council’s response, saying the screens were for patrons to enjoy watching live sport.

«You can’t even notice the TVs unless you’re inside the venue,» he told Yahoo.

«If you’ve parked your car there or you’re in the business next door, you can’t actually see the TVs anyway.»

The council decided the screens were «unacceptable» because they did not comply with building regulations to protect historic buildings in the area

Mr Brownless (pictured left), who co-owns the pub, slammed the council’s response, saying the screens are for visitors to enjoy watching live sport and are essential to his business.

The council’s move sparked outrage among patrons.

«The fun police are out again!» one person wrote.

«Time for the Heritage Fuddy Duddies to pack their bags and go,» said another.

Mr Brownless said that although he has nine other TV screens at the site, his business would take a huge hit if the two screens were removed.

A spokesman for the City for Hobart Council told Daily Mail Australia that the sports bar was not forced to remove the TVs and was given permission to keep the TVs in the outdoor area.

«It put them up without a permit, applied for a permit back and it was granted,» the spokesman said.

Salamanca is home to several sandstone warehouses and historic architecture that were built in the 1830s.

The historic docks area used to be frequented by ships carrying imported goods, but the warehouses have since been converted into shops, restaurants and pubs.

Recommended Article
Chilling warning of further rate hikes despite inflation falling to two-year low

What do you think?

Deja una respuesta

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

Richard Simmons did not direct a biopic starring Pauly Shore

The Mean Girls actress stunned the internet when she revealed she doesn’t know what Kylie Minogue is actually famous for