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World War II veteran shares stunning piece of Hitler’s possessions he kept after finding it during a search of the Nazi Fuhrer’s private office


A World War II veteran from Kansas took some of Hitler’s personal letterhead back to the US after spending the night in the Führer’s private office.

It was April 1945 when Charles Staubus found himself in Germany after high-ranking Nazi party officials began fleeing and Hitler had just committed suicide.

As the German war effort was rapidly disintegrating, Staubus found himself in Berchtesgaden, Germany, where Adolf Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest was located.

Nearby was another of Hitler’s offices known as the Little Reich Chancellery, with Hans Lammers in charge.

The officer was essentially the second seat of government in Nazi Germany.

Charles Staubus arrived in France with the US Army’s 82nd Airborne Division

In April 1945, he spent a night in an office used by top Nazi Party officials and found some of Hitler’s personal letterhead, which he used to write a letter to his father.

Staubus had previously arrived in Europe with the US Army's 82nd Airborne Division along with 160,000 Allied troops in June 1944.

Staubus had previously arrived in Europe with the US Army’s 82nd Airborne Division along with 160,000 Allied troops in June 1944.

After Hitler’s demise and with German soldiers rushing to escape, Staubus found himself overnight in Lammers’ office after the compound was heavily bombed by the Allies and captured by American forces.

“I picked the lock on his desk. The only thing he left on the table was this, a seating chart for all the top Nazis,” Staubus explained to KDAF.

In addition to the seating plan, Staubus also uncovered a stash of Hitler’s personal stationery labeled ‘Der Führer’.

“I lifted this lid. It was like a hope chest. It was half full there. It was just two sheets.

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“I kept one of them for my copies and the other I wrote a letter to my dad telling them the war was over.

In a letter dated May 8, 1945, Staubus wrote to his father using Hitler’s letterhead.

«Dear Dad, that’s right, VE Day,» came the first words. Staubus, who will turn 100 this September, has kept the 1938 letterhead and seating plan ever since.

He never told the US military about what he took home as a souvenir, or as he liked to describe it, ‘liberated’.

«They didn’t know anything about it,» he said with a cheeky grin.

The town of Berchtesgaden in Germany was the home of Adolf Hitler's Eagle's Nest.  Nearby was another of Hitler's offices known as the Little Reich Chancellery with Hans Lammers in charge

The town of Berchtesgaden in Germany was the home of Adolf Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest. Nearby was another of Hitler’s offices known as the Little Reich Chancellery with Hans Lammers in charge

Staubus, who will turn 100 in September, has kept the 1938 letterhead and seating plan ever since and still has them at his assisted living facility in Lenexa, Kansas.

Staubus, who will turn 100 in September, has kept the 1938 letterhead and seating plan ever since and still has them at his assisted living facility in Lenexa, Kansas.

There were only two sheets of letterhead left.  Staubus kept one blank and used the other to write a letter to his father

There were only two sheets of letterhead left. Staubus left one blank and used the other to write a letter to his father

The paper is in remarkably good condition for over 80 years

The paper is in remarkably good condition for over 80 years

There was also a seating chart for all the top Nazi Party officials on the table, and Staubus took that as well

There was also a seating chart for all the top Nazi Party officials on the table, and Staubus took that as well

He arrived in Europe earlier with the US Army’s 82nd Airborne Division along with 160,000 Allied troops in June 1944.

“When I first got to France, they took me to a big tent full of uniforms and said the people who had them were all dead. Anyone who you, like you, can have it,” Staubus told KDAF in commemorating the D-Day invasion on its 80th anniversary.

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D-Day commemorates the day Allied forces launched the massive invasion of Nazi-occupied Normandy, France, as part of Operation Overlord, which took place on June 6, 1944.

Thousands of American and Allied paratroopers landed around Normandy Beach in front of the largest armada of thousands of ships ever assembled, transporting massive numbers of Allied troops across the English Channel to fight against Nazi control.

It would become the largest air, land and sea attack in history, the beginning of the end of Hitler’s occupation of Europe.

Thousands of American and Allied soldiers died on D-Day and in the fighting that followed.

The successful invasion marked a major turning point in the war as it marked the beginning of the liberation of Western Europe from Nazi control.



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